Financial Statements: A Step-by-Step Guide to Understanding and Creating Financial Reports Over 200,000 copies sold | Reissue, Classic Edition

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Details about Financial Statements: A Step-by-Step Guide to Understanding and Creating Financial Reports Over 200,000 copies sold:

Simply the clearest and most comprehensive introduction to financial reporting available. No accounting background is required. “Finally, a handbook that takes the mystery out of accounting principles.” —Margi Gandolfi, VP Marketing/Strategic Planning of New York Blood Center This edition replaces all previous editions of this bestselling title based on the revised and expanded edition corrected and back to the basics. Financial Statements is a perfect introduction to financial accounting for non-financial managers, investors, business students, lawyers, lenders, entrepreneurs, and more. Financial Statements deftly shows that all this accounting and financial-reporting stuff is not rocket science and that anyone can understand it! Ittelson empowers non-financial managers by clearly and simply demonstrating how the balance sheet, income statement, and cash flow statement work together to offer a snapshot of any company’s financial health. Every term is defined in simple, understandable language. Every concept is explained with a basic, straightforward transaction example. And with the book’s uniquely visual approach, you’ll be able to see exactly how each transaction affects the three key financial statements of the enterprise. Each statement paints a different and essential picture—the “three-legged stool” of company reporting: • The income statement shows the manufacturing (or service offerings) and selling actions of the company that result in profit or loss during a period. It gives a very important perspective on the company’s performance, its profitability. • The cash flow statement details cash into and out of the company for a period. You need money to make money. Running out of cash is bad. Duh. • The balance sheet records at the end of a period, an instant in time, what the company owns and what it owes, including the owners’ stake, called shareholders’ equity.  

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